Suspect in Ohio State University attack identified as student

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- A director of public safety says a man who drove a car into pedestrians and began stabbing people at Ohio State was a student at the school.

Ohio State Department of Public Safety Director Monica Moll also identified the now-deceased suspect as Abdul Razak Ali Artan.

A U.S. official earlier told The Associated Press that he was born in Somalia and living in the United States as a legal permanent resident. The official wasn't authorized to publicly discuss details of the ongoing case and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.

Authorities say Artan was shot to death by a police officer Monday morning shortly after he drove up onto a curb into pedestrians, got out of the car and began stabbing people with a butcher knife.

The officer who killed the attacker was a university police officer who'd been on the job for less than two years. He has been identified by OSU police as 28-year-old Alan Horujko.

Ohio State Police Chief Craig Stone says it was fortunate there was a nearby gas leak that the officer had gone to investigate. Stone says it helped position Horujko to respond to the attack so quickly.

Those injured in the attack included an Ohio State faculty member, four graduate students and three undergrads.

Authorities say they were able to get photos of Artan's vehicle driving onto campus and confirmed only one person was in the car.

After Artan rammed his car into a group of pedestrians on campus, and then used a butcher knife to cut several people, students sheltered in place after receiving text alerts from the university on their cell phones and on Twitter.

"We barricaded ourselves in our rooms, like we were taught, turned off our lights and just hunkered down," said OSU student Aubrey Jenkins, also the daughter of WGN's Nancy Loo.

Many classrooms did the same, piling what they could against the doors to keep safe. Facebook activated its “marked safe” protocol so those nearby could alert worried loved ones online. And as OSU’s Emergency Management tweeted the all-clear, officials in Columbus began the investigation, thankful more people were not harmed.

"I'm very proud of the students and the faculty and the staff at OSU to do exactly what they needed to do and that was to be, get someplace safe," said Columbus Police Chief Kim Jacobs.