Twitter? Instagram? Not now for Mitchell Trubisky as he continues his development with the Bears

Chicago Bears quarterback Mitch Trubisky (10) passes against the Buffalo Bills on November 4, 2018, at New Era Field in Orchard Park, N.Y. (Brian Cassella/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images)

CHICAGO – No amusement park, not Disney World or Six Flags, could match the roller coaster that is sports commentary on social media.

Hero one day, goat the next, OK the following day, then a superhero, and back to a failure.

This is how the opinions can range from moment-to-moment, play-to-play, game-to-game, week-to-week on Twitter when it comes to a professional athlete. Especially when you’re the quarterback of an NFL – and it’s even worse for the No. 2 overall pick in the NFL Draft.

That’s the roller coaster of the “Twitterverse” which Mitchell Trubisky can endure in a given week. It’s what you’d expect, considering that general manager Ryan Pace anointed him the quarterback of the future just a few hours after he was drafted in April of 2017. The spotlight was put on him that day, and even with a dominating defense at times in 2018, it continues to get even brighter.

Trubisky knows that.

He’s got enough self-awareness to understand his place within the franchise, and how much their success will depend upon his success. Mitchell also has perspective, too, understanding that his building into a franchise quarterback will take some time. Hence he does the smartest thing when it comes to social media for someone in his position: He stays away.

“I’ve been off social media and I don’t really check it that often. I don’t really have it on my phone,” said Trubisky – who has both a Twitter and Instagram account that have few updates since September. “I don’t hear any of the outside noise – whether it be positive or negative. I just have a lot more time and my focus is elsewhere within football, family, and everything else that I’ve got going on.

“It hasn’t been a distraction for me.”

As he continues in his first year in Matt Nagy’s offensive system, that’s a good idea. There is plenty for him to learn, practice, and then put into play on game day over this first year to keep him occupied. So far the quarterback has shown some of his potential, throwing for 1,949 yards with 16 touchdowns compared to seven interceptions while completing 64.2 percent of his passes.

On the ground, he’s picked up 7.9 yards per carry with a pair of scores, showing his prowess to make positive plays a throw is not available.

Yet there are still inconsistent moments – missed throws, turnovers, misreads that can draw the ire of those watching the game and trying to grade Trubisky on the level of a Top 2 NFL pick. Satisfying the masses in the early going really takes something impressive, so staying away from the chatter has become a priority for the second-year player.

“Most of it, last year, has been negative, so it’s just a lot of negativity that I blocked out of my life and I’m just able to focus on what I need to do and who I want to be as an NFL player and a person,” said Trubisky. “It’s been a good thing for me just getting off that.”

Even if he was, Nagy said he should pay any mind to it. After all, there is only one opinion that matters when it comes to running his offense.

“The only thing he needs to worry about it what I think about him and what people in this building think about him,” said Nagy of Trubisky. “Everybody is entitled to their opinion – and that’s OK, that’s fine. There is nothing wrong with that. But as long as he just understands that the only thing that matters is what we think, then nothing will affect him.”

Staying away from social media never hurts either.